Tag Archives: Google

Not even Google Ads are safe from cryptocurrency scams 

Estimated amount stolen through the Google Ads crypto scam.

By Matt Wille (via InputMag)

When it comes to the still-burgeoning world of cryptocurrency, scams lie around every corner. Even the parts of the internet that seem safest have found themselves home to crypto scammers. But, uh, this one still manages to be shocking: Someone found a way to use Google Ads to carry out their crypto-based cons.

Scammers managed to steal more than $500,000 in cryptocurrency by placing ads for fake digital wallets, according to Check Point Research. The scammers placed ads for their fake wallets under the names of real wallets, like MetaMaskand Phantom, thereby tricking unsuspecting users into downloading the spoofs.

A Google Ad for the fake Phantom wallet.Check Point Research

The misleading ads probably would’ve been enough to trap a handful of crypto newbies, but these scammers really went all-out. The ads linked out to websites that looked eerily similar to the real deal, making it difficult to understand they’d been scammed until it was already too late.

CLASSIC PHISHING, REALLY — This scam is essentially one we’ve been dealing with since the creation of the internet: phishing. Usually, this process would take place via email or a similar messaging service, but the process here is the same. Trick unsuspecting people into giving you their personal information by pretending to be a legitimate entity.

The fake Phantom wallet website.
Check Point Research

In this case, scammers created phishing websites that appear almost identical to the real deal, right down to the branding. These sites then asked victims for the passphrase to their crypto wallet — a red flag, if you’re familiar with how these wallets work, but it might just seem like a genuine question for setting up a wallet to a newcomer.

Check Point Research observed first-hand 11 crypto wallets compromised by the scheme, each containing between $1,000 and $10,000 in cryptocurrency. The full extent of the stolen money — more than $500,000 — was only discovered by cross-referencing these observations with Reddit threads where victims spoke up.

STAY VIGILANT — Check Point Research concludes its public release about this scam with a few tips for spotting similar ones in the future. First and foremost is to never type your passphrase into a website. A passphrase is a key to recovering your crypto wallet — handing it out is even more dangerous than giving someone an account password.

As with all phishing scams, the best line of defense is to double-check the URL you’ve been sent to. In the case of crypto wallets, in particular, Check Point notes that wallets like MetaMask and Phantom are extensions, not websites. If you’re being asked to input sensitive information like your passphrase into a website rather than an extension, there’s a good chance it’s a scam.

As much as we’d like to blame Google for this mess, cryptocurrency phishing scams are a new breed. They’re not easy to spot from afar. We can only hope Google’s crypto scam detection improves as organizations like Check Point release information about them.

When it comes to cryptocurrency, though, even the most legitimate of companies can end up helping scammers achieve their goals. Enter at your own risk.

Jasmy Coin’s Recent Gains Might Not Be Sustainable for Long 

BY ANURADHA GARG (via MarketRealist)

On Oct. 9, the JASMY token was added to Coinbase, which boosted awareness of the token and the trading volume. It rose by nearly 57 percent on Oct. 8 and demonstrated the “Coinbase Effect.” The token rose another 56 percent on Oct. 12. The recent steep rise has taken many investors by surprise and they want to know about Jasmy coin’s price prediction.

Generally, cryptocurrencies have been on an uptrend for the past several months. The total cryptocurrency market cap, which fell below $150 billion in March 2020, is now above $2.2 trillion. As the adoption of cryptocurrencies rises, many altcoins have been gaining importance for their real-world uses.

What is Jasmy crypto?

Jasmy provides an IoT (internet of things) platform, which aims to decentralize the process of coordinating networks of data and devices. It does so with the help of storing and computing data on a decentralized storage network, IPFS.

Jasmy claims that it values the concept of data democracy, which means that it aims to return all the personal data files to the hands of the individuals it belongs to. In the new era of information, Jasmy wants to create an environment where data can be exchanged securely as valuables. JASMY is an Ethereum token that powers Jasmy. The coin can also be used to transfer tokens between devices and as payment for network services.

Jasmy price prediction

  • Wallet Investor isn’t positive on Jasmy’s long-term growth trajectory and sees the coin dropping in value by around 87 percent in one year.
  • Priceprediction.net also has a negative view of Jasmy crypto and sees it declining in value by 75 percent on average by the end of 2021.
  • Digital Coin Price sees an upside of more than 50 percent for the coin from the current levels by the end of 2021.

Is Jasmy a good investment?

Like many other IoT crypto networks, Jasmy aims to end the monopoly of giant platformers like Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon. While these platforms let users use the service for free, they collect personal data like behavior history. The data is managed, analyzed, and used for various purposes by their centralized systems. In some cases, the data has been leaked due to cyber attacks, system defects, and human mistakes. At times, the data is misused to deliver specific ads or content.

The future for the IoT space as a whole looks bright. According to Mordor Intelligence, the global IoT market is expected to reach $1,386 billion by 2026 from $761.4 billion in 2020. However, this doesn’t mean that the future of all IoT-related projects is good. Some rivals have advantages over Jasmy. IOTA has an early mover advantage in this space with a lot of established partnerships. Until Jasmy proves its worth in a concrete manner, it’s better to give it a pass.

Where to buy Jasmy

Jasmy has been added to Coinbase and investors can purchase it with ease from the platform. Other top exchanges that trade in Jasmy are ZT, Gate.io, Bittrex, Uniswap, and MEXC.

HCA Healthcare announces partnership with Dr. Google, exposing 32 million patient records to Big Tech’s prying eyes

By Ethan Huff (via Natural News)

A major hospital chain has struck a partnership with Google to upload 32 million private patient medical records to the Google “Cloud.”

These records from HCA Healthcare, based out of Nashville, Tenn., will reportedly be used by Google to create algorithms that instruct doctors and healthcare workers about how to treat their patients. You read that correctly: Google is planning to become America’s physician.

HCA currently operates 186 hospitals and approximately 2,000 healthcare sites across the United States. The 32 million private patient medical records it is providing to Google will supposedly be anonymized and stripped of personally identifying information.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) from Google will then take over and create computer programs that “customize” care for patients without the need for human input. Machines, in other words, will soon be administering medicine to people who are hooked into the system.

Google’s “planetary-scale database” will supposedly improve treatment for patients by calculating which drugs and vaccines will “work” the best for their bodies. HCA will then use this information to advise its staff members about how to do their jobs.

“Our contract prohibits Google Cloud from the use of patient identifiable information,” an HCA spokesman told the DailyMail Online in a statement. “Furthermore, access to any data is prohibited without HCA Healthcare’s permission.”

Nothing is sacred in a crony capitalist society

Back in 2019, we reported that Google had launched its medical AI program, known as “Project Nightingale,” in an attempt to take over modern medicine.

Wanting to control everything there is to control on planet earth, Google was busily hatching technology that would make it easy to siphon private information and capitalize it, even in the realm of healthcare.

Now, we are seeing the fruit of that labor with the HCA partnership, which The Federalist‘s Jordan Davison describes as a “privacy invasion” and “technology power grab.”

Another person on Twitter sarcastically wrote that there are no privacy issues here: “nope, not at all.”

While medical records are supposed to be protected under federal law, the rules allow for hospitals and other healthcare providers to share patient information with contractors, just so long as they abide by the same privacy protections.

“Privacy and security will be guiding principles throughout this partnership,” HCA insists.

“The access and use of patient data will be addressed through the implementation of Google Cloud’s infrastructure along with HCA Healthcare’s layers of security controls and processes.”

HCA already employed a similar technology during the Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) crisis to supposedly monitor patients who tested “positive.” The system notified caregivers as to which treatments should be administered to fight the Chinese Virus.

“Next-generation care demands data science-informed decision support so we can more sharply focus on safe, efficient and effective patient care,” HCA CEO Sam Hazen said in a statement.

“We view partnerships with leading organizations, like Google Cloud, that share our passion for innovation and continual improvement as foundational to our efforts.”

The partnership marks Google’s second known foray into healthcare. St. Louis-based Ascension also partnered with Google several years back for the same purpose, feeding more than 50 million private medical records into Google’s AI abyss.

“Two simple questions kept hounding me: Did patients know about the transfer of their data to the tech giant? Should they be informed and given a chance to opt in or out?” a whistleblower wrote in an essay for The Guardian.

“The answer to the first question quickly became apparent: no. The answer to the second I became increasingly convinced about: yes. Put the two together, and how could I say nothing?”

As Apple, Google, Amazon Ban Parler, Twitter Allegedly Profited by Refusing to Remove Child Porn

By Matt Agorist (via Free Thought Project)

As TFTP reported earlier this month, Parler has been a haven for those who have been banned, deleted, or otherwise algorithmed into the memory hole by establishment media platforms. Users moved to Parler because the platform claimed not to censor their content and it was safe space for MAGA folks. For over a year, Parler has remained an open network where pro-Trump users largely proceeded uncensored. Until now. Though the Parler url is still active, it is no longer a functioning social media site.

In the middle of the night on January 11, Amazon took down Parler from its web-hosting service. Amazon Web Services, or AWS said Parler had violated its terms of service given its inadequate content-moderation practices for failing to remove posts glorifying the recent riot at the U.S. Capitol. Google and Apple joined in as well, ensuring that Parler is deplatformed indefinitely.

This move came on the heels of a massive purge of tens of thousands of pro-Trump folks who allegedly espoused ridiculous Qanon theories. It was bad enough that these folks were duped into following the psyop known as Q. Now, however, instead of realizing the absurdity of these ideas as they are debunked in the public arena, that is no longer an option. Now, they will grasp onto these whacky ideas as the massive monopolistic power of tech behemoths imposing their neoliberal will on them gives them justification for doing so.

In the meantime, however, the social media giants Twitter and Facebook remain unfazed as they keep their insidious relationships with the US government thriving. While banning Trump for his speech during the riots at the capitol, Twitter is alleged in a lawsuit to have victimized a child by knowingly allowing a video of him to go viral.

The boy and his mother are now suing the platform alleging that it benefitted financially by failing to remove the video featuring the child and another minor — which was retweeted thousands of times and garnered nearly 200,000 views.

To be clear, this was not a mistake that simply didn’t pick up on the nature of the content. The boy and his mother, according to the lawsuit, repeatedly contacted Twitter about the content, but the social media giant allegedly didn’t suspend accounts distributing it until a federal agent from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) intervened.

In fact, according to the lawsuit, Twitter even responded to the boy and his mother via email and said the child porn did not violate its policies. According to the suit, an email shows Twitter telling John Doe on Jan. 28, 2020, that it “reviewed the content, and didn’t find a violation of our policies, so no action will be taken at this time.”

“What do you mean you don’t see a problem?” the minor asks in a response that same day. “We both are minors right now and were minors at the time these videos were taken. We both were 13 years of age.”

A subsequent screen shot shows that the video accumulated 167,000 views within a day and received more than 2,200 retweets and 6,640 likes.

The video made its way to Twitter after the boy was tricked into sharing the content with a fake account on Snapchat. The account belonged to child traffickers posing as a 16-year-old girl and they blackmailed the boy into sending in the video.

“Plaintiff John Doe was solicited and recruited for sex trafficking as a minor,” reads the lawsuit brought in part by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation (NCOSE). “After John Doe escaped from the manipulation, child sexual abuse material depicting John Doe was disseminated on Twitter. When Twitter was first alerted to this fact and John Doe’s age, Twitter refused to remove the illegal material and instead continued to promote and profit from the sexual abuse of this child.” 

Twitter has not confirmed any details about the incident. But the attorney representing the family says the video going viral — despite the heavy-handed censorship on the platform — shows that they are more concerned with censoring political speech than protecting children.

“We found it very interesting that Twitter, over the last few months, has really shown the world what kind of policing of their platform they are capable of, what the technology is they have at their fingertips, and what they are able to do,” Lisa Haba, partner at the Haba Law Firm, told Fox News in an interview.

She then added that “you would think that amongst everything they are able to police that there would be a premium priority on the protection of children. They literally have policies stating that they’ll do that but their practices say another word.”

As FOX reported, John Doe is seeking damages under the federal Trafficking Victims’ Protection Reauthorization Act, and claiming the platform was a significant cause of his distress. As the suit noted, recent legislation has clarified that Section 230 doesn’t apply to platforms that knowingly facilitate sex trafficking.

For years, TFTP has reported on this phenomenon of Facebook attacking political speech while child exploitation goes unchecked. In 2018, Facebook and Twitter — without warning or justification — deleted the pages of Free Thought Project and Police the Police which had over 5 million followers.

During this purge, they also removed hundreds of other pages including massive police accountability groups, antiwar activists, alternative media, and libertarian news outlets. Facebook claimed to remove these pages in the name of fighting disinformation online and creating a safer user experience. But this was a farce. Illustrating just how big of an ostentatious sham this was, just weeks after claiming to keep their community safe, a child was openly sold on their platform.

An auction was held on Facebook in which a child bride was put up for sale in a public post. People openly bid on Facebook for a 16-year-old girl’s hand in marriage.

Facebook claims they removed the post, but this wasn’t until weeks after the auction had ended and the girl had been sold. Had the post had something about Qanon on it, however, rest assured, it would have been removed immediately.

This was no isolated incident either. The Guardian reported a study in 2020 that suggested Facebook is not fully enforcing its own standards banning content that exploits or endangers children.

According to the study, it examined at least 366 cases between January 2013 and December 2019, according to a report from the not-for-profit investigative group Tech Transparency Project (TPP) analyzing Department of Justice news releases.

Of the 366 cases of child sex abuse on Facebook, the social media giant reported just 9% of them to authorities. Investigations initiated by authorities discovered the other 91% of the cases — not Facebook.

It’s not just Facebook either. Twitter is in the same boat. In 2020, TFTP reported on Twitter allowing the promotion of child molestation on their platform.

Since we reported on the rebranding of pedophiles as Minor Attracted Persons several years ago, the terminology became so popular that it morphed into multiple categories and abbreviations. There are now NOMAPS, which apparently are the “best kind” of MAP because the “NO” means they don’t want to have sex with children. That’s where the pro-c MAPs come in. The “pro-c” denotes pro-contact as in the belief that children can consent into having physical contact and sex with an adult. Children cannot consent to sex with an adult.

Though our report led to the deletion of multiple accounts who openly advocated for sex with children, these pro-pedophile tags on Twitter still openly trend to promote this content.

The platforms that swiftly moved in and banned pro-peace, anti-racist, pro-liberty, and antiwar speech have no problem allowing #mappositivity #mappositivity2 #mappositivity3 #mappride #mapcommunity#mapcommunity2 #mapally #promap #zoophile #zoopride #zoopositivity #zoosexual.

If you still think that big tech censorship is in your best interests, you need to read this article.