Tag Archives: Scam

Not even Google Ads are safe from cryptocurrency scams 

Estimated amount stolen through the Google Ads crypto scam.

By Matt Wille (via InputMag)

When it comes to the still-burgeoning world of cryptocurrency, scams lie around every corner. Even the parts of the internet that seem safest have found themselves home to crypto scammers. But, uh, this one still manages to be shocking: Someone found a way to use Google Ads to carry out their crypto-based cons.

Scammers managed to steal more than $500,000 in cryptocurrency by placing ads for fake digital wallets, according to Check Point Research. The scammers placed ads for their fake wallets under the names of real wallets, like MetaMaskand Phantom, thereby tricking unsuspecting users into downloading the spoofs.

A Google Ad for the fake Phantom wallet.Check Point Research

The misleading ads probably would’ve been enough to trap a handful of crypto newbies, but these scammers really went all-out. The ads linked out to websites that looked eerily similar to the real deal, making it difficult to understand they’d been scammed until it was already too late.

CLASSIC PHISHING, REALLY — This scam is essentially one we’ve been dealing with since the creation of the internet: phishing. Usually, this process would take place via email or a similar messaging service, but the process here is the same. Trick unsuspecting people into giving you their personal information by pretending to be a legitimate entity.

The fake Phantom wallet website.
Check Point Research

In this case, scammers created phishing websites that appear almost identical to the real deal, right down to the branding. These sites then asked victims for the passphrase to their crypto wallet — a red flag, if you’re familiar with how these wallets work, but it might just seem like a genuine question for setting up a wallet to a newcomer.

Check Point Research observed first-hand 11 crypto wallets compromised by the scheme, each containing between $1,000 and $10,000 in cryptocurrency. The full extent of the stolen money — more than $500,000 — was only discovered by cross-referencing these observations with Reddit threads where victims spoke up.

STAY VIGILANT — Check Point Research concludes its public release about this scam with a few tips for spotting similar ones in the future. First and foremost is to never type your passphrase into a website. A passphrase is a key to recovering your crypto wallet — handing it out is even more dangerous than giving someone an account password.

As with all phishing scams, the best line of defense is to double-check the URL you’ve been sent to. In the case of crypto wallets, in particular, Check Point notes that wallets like MetaMask and Phantom are extensions, not websites. If you’re being asked to input sensitive information like your passphrase into a website rather than an extension, there’s a good chance it’s a scam.

As much as we’d like to blame Google for this mess, cryptocurrency phishing scams are a new breed. They’re not easy to spot from afar. We can only hope Google’s crypto scam detection improves as organizations like Check Point release information about them.

When it comes to cryptocurrency, though, even the most legitimate of companies can end up helping scammers achieve their goals. Enter at your own risk.

There’s a Squid Game cryptocurrency… but it could prove to be a risky investment 

Via MalayMail

A mysterious Squid Game token recently appeared on the PancakeSwap marketplace. While it may get attention through its name, it could well turn out to be a scam attempt to lure fans of the series and get money from them.

Is the Squid Game craze taking over the world of cryptocurrencies as well? In any case, a mysterious crypto asset project has been reaching huge sums since its launch on October 26. Launched at a price of US$0.012, yesterday it was worth US$4.50. As of Thursday, it was recording an increase of nearly 2,400 per cent in 24 hours. So why is this cryptocurrency making such a splash? It seems that the only reason is the power of the Squid Gamebrand.

It’s impossible to ignore the recent Korean Netflix series that is a sensation across the globe. The plot focuses on a deadly competition where the prize is a huge amount of money. In order to win, players have to participate in children’s games and a misstep equals death. This series has been breaking records for Netflix around the world.

A potentially dangerous ‘cryptocurrency’? 

Caution is in order however when it comes to this cryptocurrency, whose process is proving to be a bit murky. CoinMarketCap has issued a warning, as many users have found that they could not sell these tokens. The reason? The whitepaper for this cryptocurrency outlines an anti-dumping technology that prevents buyers from reselling their coins if certain conditions are not met. This kind of token is particularly popular right now for certain schemes that involve creating value for the creator and leaving others high and dry. Such cryptocurrencies often have no clear, specific purpose and don’t have any particular new technological project. In short they simply surf on the success of a trend or meme to acquire value.

This particular token was launched as an exclusive form of payment for a “Squid Game” project created by gamer fans, a platform that will allow users to play and win money in an online tournament, known as “play to earn.” This competition will be launched in November and mimics the series by offering six games; the overall winner will win a yet to be determined sum.

The warning from CoinMarketCap comes amid a recent spate of Squid Game-related scams and malware, with cybercriminals looking to lure fans. This cryptocurrency is not officially linked to the series. 

Nissan being sued for electromagnetic radiation emitted from electric “LEAF” vehicle

By Ethan Huff (via Natural News)

A Georgia man has filed a lawsuit against Nissan accusing the automaker of “permanently damaging his health” and “destroying his family and career.”

What did Nissan do, exactly? According to the plaintiff, the company’s “green” LEAF vehicle emitted so much electromagnetic radiation that it caused him to develop lifelong health problems.

The 2015 LEAF has a battery underneath the seat that the plaintiff says is a heavy emitter of low-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) radiation. Said radiation allegedly caused him to develop uncontrolled eye dilation, chest palpitations, memory loss, difficulty concentrating, and “sporadic hallucinations.”

“Towards the end of January 2017, the plaintiff had a difficult time to distinguish what was real and what was not, and as a result was terminated from his job,” the plaintiff’s lawyer says.

“On January 25th, the plaintiff was hospitalized with inability to hear and speak. Going forward, the plaintiff kept suffering physical and mental symptoms and his marriage fell apart as his wife filed for divorce on April 15th, 2017.”

“Safe” levels of EMF are considered to be 2 mG (milligauss) or less. However, the 2015 Nissan LEAF, according to the lawsuit, emits EMF at the following levels:

• Driver’s floor – up to 9.2 mG, Top of the seat – up to 5.3 mG
• Passenger floor – up to 13.1 mG, Top of the seat – up to 4.9 mG
• Back row floor – up to 31.3 mG, Top of the seat – up to 4.5 mG
• Back row / top of the elevated floor panel at the center of the vehicle – up to 12.6 mG

Is your “green” vehicle killing you?

Prior to purchasing and driving his Nissan LEAF, the plaintiff says he was active and healthy. Everything changed after he started driving his “green” vehicle, which he says left him unable to work because of worsening physical symptoms.

The plaintiff says that working on a computer for more than two hours at a time causes his symptoms to become exponentially more several. It has taken him several years, he says, to “get his life in sort-of order where he can function in a society.”

In January 2017, the plaintiff had to be hospitalized for “chest palpitations” and “facial tingling combined with pressures on his cheeks that felt like the cheeks were about to collapse into his face and breathing difficulties.”

Ever since that time, the plaintiff says he has continued to suffer health setbacks due to chest pains, heart palpitations, low energy, insomnia, ringing in the ears, and facial tingling, all of which he says resulted from exposure to his Nissan LEAF.

In addition to seeking $10 million in damages from the company, the plaintiff also wants Nissan to pay another $990 million for gross negligence in the production of this dangerous vehicle.

With this money, the plaintiff plans to “start a non-profit, public awareness entity to educate people around the world about the dangers of long-term exposure to low-frequency EMF radiation emitted by many unshielded electronic devices such as electric cars, cell phones, microwaves, high voltage powerlines … etc.”

Tesla, by the way, is also producing dangerous vehicles. As we reported, Elon Musk’s “green” vehicles are driving themselves off the road or exploding randomly for no reason, putting people’s lives at risk.

One wonders what the EMF levels are in Teslas, and if they are comparable to those identified in the 2015 Nissan LEAF. Perhaps someone needs to conduct some tests on those cars as well to see if they, too, are killing people with dangerous radiation.

As for the Nissan LEAF case, it was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia: Josef Tater, v. Nissan North America, Inc.